Republika Slovenija
Iskanje:

Novice

Sporočila za javnost WIPO

WIPO Press Releases

Switzerland is the world’s most-innovative country followed by Sweden, the United States of America (U.S.), the Netherlands and the United Kingdom (U.K.), according to the 2019 edition of the Global Innovation Index (GII), which also identifies regional leaders India, South Africa, Chile, Israel and Singapore, with China, Viet Nam and Rwanda topping their income groups.


World Intellectual Property Day 2019 explores how innovation, creativity and the intellectual property (IP) rights that encourage and protect them support the development and worldwide enjoyment of sports.

Zadnje novice EPO in EPU

News from the European Patent Office

During the month of August, all EPO canteens and cafeterias are turning into cashless premises.

This step enhances relations between the two technology organisations, and is also an invitation to other local institutions as well as Bavarian stakeholders to engage in an inspiring exchange on innovation.

The EPO has published its Environmental Report 2018 which presents the environmental impact of the EPO's operations data across all locations in Berlin, Munich, The Hague and Vienna in 2018 and compares the results with those achieved in 2017.

Zadnje novice Sveta EU – Konkurenčnost (notranji trg, industrija in raziskave)

Zadnje novice IP Watch

Original news and analysis on international IP policy

Dear Readers, After 15 years of original, independent, thoughtful, and timely reporting on global policymaking from the inside, Intellectual Property Watch (IP-Watch) is announcing today a pause on reporting services as it embarks on a transition phase to devise new strategies for future work.

Following today’s announcement of a one-year pause on IP-Watch reporting, we invite all IP-Watch readers to sign up here for free daily, weekly or monthly news bulletins from our sister publication, Health Policy Watch, which will include health-related IP reporting as part of its portfolio. You can follow Health Policy Watch (www.healthpolicy-watch.org) on Twitter @HealthPolicyW.

Ryan Abbott writes: For more than sixty years, “obviousness” has set the bar for patentability.  Under this standard, if a hypothetical “person having ordinary skill in the art” would find an invention obvious in light of existing relevant information, then the invention cannot be patented.  This skilled person is defined as a non-innovative worker with a limited knowledge-base.  The more creative and informed the skilled person, the more likely an invention will be considered obvious.  The standard has evolved since its introduction, and it is now on the verge of an evolutionary leap: Inventive machines are increasingly being used in research, and once the use of such machines becomes standard, the person skilled in the art should be a person using an inventive machine, or just an inventive machine.  Unlike the skilled person, the inventive machine is capable of innovation and considering the entire universe of prior art.  As inventive machines continue to improve, this will increasingly raise the bar to patentability, eventually rendering innovative activities obvious.  The end of obviousness means the end of patents, at least as they are now.
Naslovnica | O uradu | O intelektualni lastnini | Priročnik za izumitelje | Za novinarje | Kontakt in podatki